Vimeo has got a great way for content creators to charge for their videos, which can now either be sold or rented. The New York-based video-hosting site announced the new Vimeo On Demand feature earlier in the year, as a way for its paying users to sell their works online as part of a new program.

The Vimeo On Demand feature is available to its paying Pro users (a $199 a year service), and allows them to sell access to their videos to other users. Video creators can set their own price for the video, and then get a 90/10 revenue split. This means users keep 90 percent of the revenue. Other features include the option for video makers to select where exactly they want their video to be available, as well as the design of the page around it.

 

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Until now, its income has come from subscriptions by content creators to upgrade their accounts; from adverts; and from transactions, such as people buying music tracks whose video they've watched. There's also a "tipjar", introduced last September, to let people make voluntary donations. However, there was no block on viewing the videos. With the new service, you won't be able to see the work until you've paid, just like any other video-on-demand offering.

Until now, its income has come from subscriptions by content creators to upgrade their accounts; from adverts; and from transactions, such as people buying music tracks whose video they've watched. There's also a "tipjar", introduced last September, to let people make voluntary donations. Vimeo is hoping to make itself more attractive to professionals by becoming online equivalent of video rental store.

Vimeo, has about 15 million members and is challenging DailyMotion as the second-biggest video site - though a huge distance behind Google's YouTube. Presently it gets about 93m monthly views, according to chief executive Kerry Trainor.

"Lots of creators earn revenue from content. Now we'll have a paywall, which is Vimeo-on-demand. We think it will mean people offering quality, and a level of control and flexibility - there's also control over geographical distribution, and a window of availability," says Trainor. The minimum charge for a view will be 99 US cents, payable via credit card or PayPal.

That means that the creator could choose which regions a video is shown in - useful, perhaps, for a film studio that wanted to control the visibility of a movie trailer ahead of staggered releases. "It could be entertainment, sports, information," says Trainor. He thinks both professionals and amateurs will want to use it.